Onion Jam: Savory Sweet Spread

Tracy R. | Sugarcrafter

This savory-sweet onion jam is a great condiment for burgers, or simply spread on top of toast with cheese. Or, kick your favorite pizza and flatbread toppings up a notch by spreading a bit over the top of your dough.

Onion Jam Photo

This year seems to have been one of the harshest winters we've had in the U.S. in a long time. As I stare out at the winter tundra that is my backyard, it's hard to even imagine green grass growing, let alone fruits and vegetables.

As someone who lives in the cold, snowy north year round, it's hard to do a lot of canning and preserving when access to local, seasonal produce becomes extremely limited during the winter months. While I do freeze a lot of the fruit I pick over the summer to get us through the winter, I tend to use that fruit in baked goods or stirred into my morning oatmeal rather than in jams and jellies, which already have their own (very large) section in the pantry.

Still, there a few canning projects that are made for the winter - marmalades (like my margarita marmalade) are definitely one of them, and this onion jam is another, as even in the middle of winter, there are plenty of local onions to be had if you make friends with a few local farmers.

Still, onion jam sounds a little odd. Is it more savory, or more sweet? How do you use it? Well, I can promise you that it's completely delicious, and there are plenty of things to do with it. This jam is actually very versatile, and is perfect on a grilled cheese sandwich, a bagel with cream cheese - or, as one of my personal favorites, a pizza or flatbread topping along with pears, prosciutto, and gorgonzola.

Heck, you can stir it into risotto, serve it on top of grilled sausages or hot dogs, or jut set out a jar with a cheese and charcuterie tray for an easy appetizer. I'd love to hear about your favorite ways to use it!

    80 Servings

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds onion, sweet yellow or red, sliced
  • 2/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
  • 1/2 cup red wine
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary, or thyme
  • 4 cups granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup brown sugar, packed
  • 1 3/4 ounces powdered pectin, (one package)

Directions

  1. In a large sauce pan, combine the onions, vinegars, and wine. Toss in the sprigs of thyme or rosemary. Bring to a boil over medium heat, and then reduce the heat and let simmer, stirring occasionally, until the onions are tender. Remove the herbs and stir in the pectin. Bring to a boil. Stir in the sugars and let boil one minute longer. Remove the pot from the heat.
  2. Prepare your canning supplies. Bring the temperature of the glass jars up by processing them in hot water for several minutes, and heat a few cups of water in a small saucepan for the lids.
  3. Ladle the hot jam into the hot jars, leaving 1/4″ headspace. Place the lids and bands on top, screwing on the bands just until fingertip-tight. Place the full jars back into the boiling water and process 15 minutes. Allow the jars to sit in the canner 5 minutes with the heat and lid off. Remove from the water and place the jars on a towel. Let the jars cool. The seals should suck down.

Recommended Equipment


Onion jam photo

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Tracy rericha

About Tracy

Tracy fell in love with locavorism, and built a business out of Canning & Preserving. She shares all sorts of recipes on Sugarcrafter, and her passion for canning here, but we love her rhubarb jam most of all.

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This looks wonderful. Have you developed a version where you could use less sugar and use something like Pomona Pectin? I could see using this jam for all kinds of things, but dietary restrictions would put that much sugar out of reach :^(